Thanks to all who submitted your book for consideration in the 2022 Porchlight Business Book Awards! Browse last year's Awards winners here.

New Releases

Books to Watch | February 1, 2022

February 01, 2022

Share

Each and every week, our marketing team—Dylan Schleicher (DJJS), Gabbi Cisneros (GMC), and Emily Porter (EPP)—highlights a few new books we are most excited about.

This week, our choices are:

New Releases.png

All Are Welcome: How to Build a Real Workplace Culture of Inclusion that Delivers Results by Cynthia Owyoung, McGraw-Hill (GMC) 

From diversity and inclusion expert who’s worked at Charles Schwab, Yahoo, Inuit and more comes a clear roadmap for building equity and diversity into any organization’s DNA  
 
Pressure to make equity, diversity, and inclusion an organizational priority—on par with the pursuit of profits and growth—is greater today than ever, but accomplishing it is no small task. 
 
All Are Welcome takes DEI Officers, HR managers, and leaders beyond the mere practice of hiring diverse staff to make inclusion part of the equation, too. The author argues that a strong practice of inclusion is necessary to keep employee retention up, make diversity efforts stick, and cultivate an organization able to meet diverse customer needs and outperform competitors. 
 
All Are Welcome provides everything readers need to understand how DEI benefits everyone how to focus on a culture of inclusion and belonging to make DEI efforts stick and how to implement a CARE (Courage, Accountability, Respect, Empowerment) mindset to drive progress. 

 

Don't Cry for Me by Daniel Black, Hanover Square Press (EPP) 

As Jacob lies dying, he begins to write a letter to his only son, Isaac. They have not met or spoken in many years, and there are things that Isaac must know. Stories about his ancestral legacy in rural Arkansas that extend back to slavery. Secrets from Jacob's tumultuous relationship with Isaac's mother and the shame he carries from the dissolution of their family. Tragedies that informed Jacob's role as a father and his reaction to Isaac's being gay. 
 
But most of all, Jacob must share with Isaac the unspoken truths that reside in his heart. He must give voice to the trauma that Isaac has inherited. And he must create a space for the two to find peace.  
 
With piercing insight and profound empathy, acclaimed author Daniel Black illuminates the lived experiences of Black fathers and queer sons, offering an authentic and ultimately hopeful portrait of reckoning and reconciliation. Spare as it is sweeping, poetic as it is compulsively readable, Don't Cry for Me is a monumental novel about one family grappling with love's hard edges and the unexpected places where hope and healing take flight. 

 

The Power Law: Venture Capital and the Making of the New Future by Sebastian Mallaby, Penguin Press (DJJS)  

Innovations rarely come from “experts.” Elon Musk was not an “electric car person” before he started Tesla. When it comes to improbable innovations, a legendary tech VC told Sebastian Mallaby, the future cannot be predicted, it can only be discovered. It is the nature of the venture-capital game that most attempts at discovery fail, but a very few succeed at such a scale that they more than make up for everything else. That extreme ratio of success and failure is the power law that drives the VC business, all of Silicon Valley, the wider tech sector, and, by extension, the world.  

In The Power Law, Sebastian Mallaby has parlayed unprecedented access to the most celebrated venture capitalists of all time—the key figures at Sequoia, Kleiner Perkins, Accel, Benchmark, and Andreessen Horowitz, as well as Chinese partnerships such as Qiming and Capital Today—into a riveting blend of storytelling and analysis that unfurls the history of tech incubation, in the Valley and ultimately worldwide. We learn the unvarnished truth, often for the first time, about some of the most iconic triumphs and infamous disasters in Valley history, from the comedy of errors at the birth of Apple to the avalanche of venture money that fostered hubris at WeWork and Uber.  

VCs’ relentless search for grand slams brews an obsession with the ideal of the lone entrepreneur-genius, and companies seen as potential “unicorns” are given intoxicating amounts of power, with sometimes disastrous results. On a more systemic level, the need to make outsized bets on unproven talent reinforces bias, with women and minorities still represented at woefully low levels. This does not just have social justice implications: as Mallaby relates, China’s homegrown VC sector, having learned at the Valley’s feet, is exploding and now has more women VC luminaries than America has ever had. Still, Silicon Valley VC remains the top incubator of business innovation anywhere—it is not where ideas come from so much as where they go to become the products and companies that create the future. By taking us so deeply into the VCs’ game, The Power Law helps us think about our own future through their eyes. 

 

The Power of Regret: How Looking Backward Moves Us Forward by Daniel H. Pink, Riverhead Books (DJJS)

Everybody has regrets, Daniel H. Pink explains in The Power of Regret. They’re a universal and healthy part of being human. And understanding how regret works can help us make smarter decisions, perform better at work and school, and bring greater meaning to our lives. 
 
Drawing on research in social psychology, neuroscience, and biology, Pink debunks the myth of the “no regrets” philosophy of life. And using the largest sampling of American attitudes about regret ever conducted as well as his own World Regret Survey—which has collected regrets from more than 15,000 people in 105 countries—he lays out the four core regrets that each of us has. These deep regrets offer compelling insights into how we live and how we can find a better path forward. 

As he did in his bestsellers Drive, When, and A Whole New Mind, Pink lays out a dynamic new way of thinking about regret and frames his ideas in ways that are clear, accessible, and pragmatic. Packed with true stories of people’s regrets as well as practical takeaways for reimagining regret as a positive force, The Power of Regret shows how we can live richer, more engaged lives. 

 

We have updated our privacy policy. Click here to read our full policy.